PEScience is a well respected, if little known company that sells a wide range of supplements aimed at the bodybuilding market.

Today we are looking at Erase Pro + a cortisol supporting supplement that is aimed at hardcore gym goers. It literally says on the packaging that it is not aimed at “your average joe gym-goer”.

Erase Pro+ is designed to be used as a standalone product, but PEScience claim that it also works well when stacked with Norcodrene, and AnaBeta Elite.

One immediate downside to Erase Pro+ is the use of a proprietary blend, rather than an open ingredients list. This means that it is difficult to review, due to not knowing correct doses.

Considering the fact that companies such as Jacked Factory are gaining plaudits for their honesty, this practice by PEScience seems behind the times, and loses them some credibility points.

In this article we are going to look at the individual ingredients and review each one in turn, we will then review the product as a whole.

Ingredients List

The main ingredient in PEScience’s Erase Pro + supplement is Ashwagandha (Root) Extract, it is also the only ingredient where the dosage is labelled (675mg). Erase Pro + also contains Boerhaavia Diffusa (Root) extract, Uncaria Tomentosa (Bark) extract, and Pine (Bark) extract.

Ashwagandha (Root) Extract – What’s nice about Erase Pro + is that they use a really high dosage of Ashwagandha root extract for a supplement. However, while 675mg is on the top end of the scale for most supplement companies, it is still quite low compared to the recommended daily dosage of 6,000mg [1].

You would need to be taking around 9-10 servings per day to get the perfect daily dosage, which just isn’t practical. Ashwagandha is a very effective supplement for lowering cortisol, and a dosage as low as 300mg (less than half of what Erase Pro + contains) has been shown to reduce serum cortisol by 27.9% [2].

Ashwagandha can also reduce anxiety, lower stress, and it can even help you lift more in the gym! Multiple studies have shown it to increase power [3].

• Boerhaavia Diffusa (Root) Extract – This is a common herb used in alternative medicine, often for its supposed anti-diabetic benefits. It may also work as an effective diuretic. There is limited evidence that it reduces cortisol, just a single study performed on mice. Though the study did find that Boerhaavia Diffusa reduced serum cortisol and glucose [4].

• Uncaria Tomentosa (Bark) Extract – More commonly known as Cat’s Claw, this is a vine that may help to reduce fatigue (which can lead to increased cortisol). It may also reduce estrogen levels, which could also be of use to bodybuilders.

• Pine (Bark) Extract – Also known as Pycnogenol, this supplement is usually known for its effect on nitric oxide, and being a pretty effective erectile aid (nitric oxide can increase blood flow). It may also work as a testosterone booster, but evidence for this is extremely limited.

 PEScience Erase Pro + Review

On the whole, this product can be relied upon to reduce Cortisol production. Which is exactly what it promises to do. It is a shame that PEScience uses a proprietary blend, which makes it impossible to review the product properly.

Erase Pro + is a really decent cortisol supporting supplement, but there are others out there that may be even more effective.

Related: Top 10 Best Estrogen Blockers for Men in 2017

References

[1] https://examine.com/supplements/ashwagandha/

[2] Chandrasekhar, K., Kapoor, J., Anishetty, S. 2012. A prospective, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study of safety and efficacy of a high-concentration full-spectrum extract of Ashwagandha root in reducing stress and anxiety in adults. Indian Journal of Psychological Medication 34(3): 255-62(link) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23439798

[3] Wankhede, S., Langade, D., Joshi, K., Sinha, S., Bhattacharyya, S. 2015. Examining the effect of Withania somnifera supplementation on muscle strength and recovery: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 25(12): 43(link) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26609282

[4] Gholap, S., Kar, A. 2004. Hypoglycaemic effects of some plant extracts are possibly mediated through inhibition in corticosteroid concentration. Die Pharmazie 59(11): 876-8(link) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15587591

 

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